The Outback Blog

It’s 23 degrees and blustery — would you head outside without your warm gloves, coat and hat?

Your trees and shrubs are pretty chilly out there, too. You’ve invested time and money in your green friends.

Have you thought about winter shrub protection? Are you preparing trees for winter?

Better get to it. Here’s what to do.


Bugs love trees. Some head straight to the leaves and start munching. Others attack the fruit.

Boring, tunneling pests are the worst, invading through the bark and cutting off your tree’s water flow.

Usually, your tree can bounce back from pest attacks. A healthy tree is pretty sturdy.

But repeated infestations weaken a tree and can eventually kill it. And some tree pests are more deadly than others.


A brown tree is never a good thing. So when you gaze up at your majestic blue spruce and realize its top towering branches are a crispy brown, you’re right to be concerned.


Just when you thought it was time to stow the garden tools for the season, you get this news: winter is great for pruning.

In fact, winter is the best time for pruning trees and shrubs. You can wait a bit for grasses, but it’ll still be chilly when they need a trim.

Sure, it's more comfy for YOU to tackle this task in July. In shorts. Holding an icy lemonade. But your plants prefer it now.

Here are 6 benefits of winter pruning. We'll even tell you when to tackle it.


Trees can give you shade, wildlife homes and your landscape a more established look.

Add in some colorful blooms, and you’ve got a stunning focal point with some major aesthetic value.

Sounds like a real win-win, right?

There are a variety of flowering trees that will thrive in your Idaho Falls landscape, but it’s important you choose the right ones for your space.

Check out the benefits and best trees you can start enjoying on your property.


In Idaho Falls, there’s a lot of wind. And for you folks who have more land—one or more acres—and are next to farm fields, there’s not a lot on these flat stretches of land to stop the wind from blowing.

Enter windbreaks, rows of trees that provide a screen or protection from the wind, as well as blowing sand or dirt. When the wind hits, a windbreak lifts the wind up and over, protecting the property.


With spring quickly approaching, our clients are getting anxious about seeing the first leaves and buds on their trees. If it hasn’t happened already, it will be happening soon.

But sometimes we get calls from clients whose trees aren’t coming out of dormancy. Instead of new leaves unravelling from the tips of branches, the tree is still bare. Or the leaves are pale and fall off within a few days.


5 Things You Can Do NOW to Prepare Your Idaho Landscape For Winter

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Landscape MaintenanceAutumn is an amazing time of transition. With the summer’s heat and activities wrapped up, fall is time to enjoy the outdoors in a whole new way.

We bundle up a bit more. We marvel at the brilliance of color that emerges and the changes that take place as nature prepares itself for a long winter’s sleep.

Around your home, the feeling is an interesting mix. As temperatures cool, homeowners make a mad dash outdoors on sunny days trying to complete any cleanup tasks before it becomes too cold to venture outdoors. It’s reminiscent of preparing for hibernation, so we can soon rest easy and stay warm and cozy indoors.

While many landscape tips and suggestions focus on maintenance during the growing season, autumn is an essential time of year for performing landscape tasks. In fact, preparing the landscape now, while temperatures are in the low 40s or even high 30s, can result in substantial outcomes for the next spring and summer.

Since the window of time to complete these tasks is short, we’ve narrowed down the top items to focus on to prepare your Idaho landscape for winter.


Make the Most of Maple Trees In Your Idaho Home Landscape

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Maple trees in Idaho

Golden branches blazing amidst evergreens as if kissed by the sun.

Leaves in fresh shades of pumpkin and carrot bursting in front of bronze and russet canopies.

And then the stars of the show: the rubies and scarlets and crimsons that make passers-by stop and just watch the scene with wonder.

Autumn is on its way. And trees are the main attractions—giving height to the vivid, endless color that adorns the landscape.

One of the tree species that tends to be a favorite in the fall show here in Idaho is the maple tree. 


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